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CLAUDY JONGSTRA STUDIO, Layers of Diversity, 2023, multipanel dyed wool installation. Site-specific commission.

Lobby Reception Desks

Primary + Secondary Entry

Our client commissioned Claudy Jongstra Studio, to create three site-specific fiber artwork installations that are integrated into the lobby’s reception desks. With expressive strokes of vibrant color created from plant-based dyes using indigenous wool, Jongstra’s artwork contributes to the creation of healthy and inspiring environments. The artwork celebrates the abundance of nature with a layered composition of plant-based colors, drawing inspiration from the geology and hydrology of Charlotte, which produced the conditions for America’s first ever gold discovery.

The golden hues of Charlotte’s rare and valuable gold deposits are created using humble onion skins, a common waste material that is given new life and value. The main material for the artwork commission is wool humanely sheared from Drenthe Heath sheep. They are the oldest breed from northern Europe and very rare. Originally, this breed had one purpose only, landscape preservation and balancing ecosystems. On Jongstra’s farm, the wool is a valuable resource, as such, the sheep endure no stress, antibiotics, and live in safe harmony.

The revelation of colors from plants onto fibers from indigenous wool requires diverse and dynamic knowledge and skill, providing a model for growth toward sustainable futures. In this way, the natural dye process is a metaphor of transformation that reflects the philosophy of Truist to build better lives and communities by centering care.

CLAUDY JONGSTRA, Layers of Diversity, 2023, multipanel dyed wool installation. Site-specific commission.

CLAUDY JONGSTRA, Layers of Diversity, 2023, multipanel dyed wool installation. Site-specific commission.

CLAUDY JONGSTRA STUDIO, Layers of Diversity, 2023, multipanel dyed wool installation. Site-specific commission.

Inset Niches

Primary + Secondary Lobby

In the vibrant canvases of New York-based artist An Hoang, viewers find themselves enveloped in expressions of nature that transcend the ordinary. Hoang’s art captures the ephemeral aspects of the natural world—the shifting patterns of weather, the elusive play of light, and the cyclical change of seasons. Through her use of cloud-like forms and the subtle gradations of light and shadow, Hoang crafts compositions that delve into the unseen forces of nature as well as the visible world. Characterized by vivid colors and dynamic energy, Hoang’s paintings serve as a reminder of nature’s endless capacity for renewal and transformation.

AN HOANG, Two Skies, 2024, oil on canvas. Site-specific commission in collaboration with Tracey Morgan Gallery.

AN HOANG, Two Skies, 2024, oil on canvas. Site-specific commission in collaboration with Tracey Morgan Gallery.

DAMIAN STAMER, Collaboration 2, 2024, oil on linen. Site-specific commission in collaboration with SOCO Gallery.

North Carolina-based artist Damian Stamer delves into the themes of memory and importance in his large- scale paintings. His works are deeply rooted in his childhood memories of the South, blending the dynamic energy of gestural brushstrokes with references of Southern life. His layered paintings infuse the canvas with a sense of life and motion, navigating the delicate balance between creation and fading away, reflecting on how the past shapes our present. Damian Stamer's work is a tribute to the enduring allure of the South, a contemplation on the ways we connect with places and moments long passed but not forgotten.

DAMIAN STAMER, Collaboration 2, 2024, oil on linen. Site-specific commission in collaboration with SOCO Gallery.

DAMIAN STAMER, Collaboration 1, 2024, oil on linen. Site-specific commission in collaboration with SOCO Gallery.

East Wall

Site-Specific Mural

Imagine the impossible pays homage to Alan Turing, a pioneering figure in computing, through a captivating visual narrative. It showcases a portrait of Turing with gears beneath symbolizing the mechanics behind the first computer. This imagery transitions into a depiction of ants working collaboratively to elevate a leaf, evolving into a DNA strand and then pixelating into binary code. This sequence not only highlights Turing’s contributions but also reflects on the blend of technology and biology, a theme central to his work. The binary code across the mural spells out a Turing quote, emphasizing the power of imagination in creating the impossible, directly linking the artwork back to Turing’s revolutionary vision for computing.

IRISOL GONZALEZ, Imagine the impossible, 2021. Site-specific commission.

By incorporating those who once dreamed beyond their time, those who encounter their story today can be inspired to collaborate and innovate. The use of natural components in the design fosters connectivity to each other and to our world. Scientists and engineers observe how problems are solved in nature and mimic their solutions through technology. It’s important to incorporate the machines that Turing and Johnson used in order to highlight the use of technology as a tool. These concepts offer a look into the past for inspiration from what was, what is, and what is next.”

Irisol Gonzalez, Artist

West Wall

Site-Specific Mural

The link between nature and magic honors Katherine Johnson, a pivotal figure in NASA’s history, celebrated for her calculations that propelled the first Americans into space and to the moon. Johnson’s image is set against a backdrop of the early women mathematicians at NASA, highlighting the groundbreaking contributions of women in STEM and the barriers they’ve surmounted. Adjacent to her, a globe symbolizes the remarkable evolution of tools that have shaped our world. A path of discrete math formulas unfolds before her, representing the foundation of computer algorithms, leading to a silicon chip-patterned leaf that echoes natural designs, emphasizing nature’s role in inspiring innovation. This leaf, specifically from a coffee plant, playfully nods to Java programming language, connecting the organic with the digital. The formulas extend into a cosmic space, dissolving into the vast, mysterious expanse of the universe, capturing the limitless potential of mathematics and technology.

IRISOL GONZALEZ, The link between nature and magic, 2021. Site-specific commission.

Lounge

Site-specific Dimensional Mural

Triangulation by Martha Clippinger is a vibrant, site-specific dimensional mural that brings a contemporary burst of energy and color to its surroundings. Through a dynamic interplay of geometric shapes and a bold color palette, the mural embodies the interconnectedness of ideas, innovation, and community. Clippinger uses alternating patterns of color and form to create an uplifting visual rhythm, with areas of flat color symbolizing open opportunities and striped sections representing the formation of connections. This design not only enhances the aesthetic of the space but also serves as a metaphor for collaboration, merging diverse experiences and concepts to foster innovation. The use of mosaic elements further emphasizes the importance of collective purpose, making the work of art a visually engaging piece that encourages viewers to think about the ways in which individual parts contribute to a greater whole.

MARTHA CLIPPINGER, triangulation, 2021. Site-specific commission.

MARTHA CLIPPINGER, triangulation, 2021. Site-specific commission.

KATRINA SÁNCHEZ STANDFIELD, Looking for el Carnaval, 2022, sustainable fiber. Commission.

Open Collaboration

Low-Relief Sculpture + Site Specific Murals

Katrina Sánchez Standfield explores themes of connection, healing, and security through her distinctive approach to soft sculpture. In Looking for el Carnaval, she creates vibrant, three-dimensional forms by combining knit and woven textiles. She crafts each ‘knitted noodle,’ which is both knit and stuffed, to act as an exaggerated version of the traditional warp and weft. This process transforms color and texture into a dynamic exploration within the physical space, offering a vivid, tactile experience.

Thomas Campbell’s sculptural installations, Pines and Piedmont, offer a profound connection to North Carolina’s landscapes through distinct yet complementary approaches. “Pines” draws its inspiration from the serene experience of meandering through a pine tree forest, aiming to instill a sense of calm and introspection. As part of Campbell’s Broken Volumes Series, this piece leverages the aesthetics of industrial steel fabrication, utilizing bends or “brakes” to sculpt form, depth, and dimension, mirroring the forest’s natural architecture.

Piedmont adopts a more organic perspective, employing similar brake techniques to evoke North Carolina’s iconic rolling hills and valleys. The sculpture’s form undulates in a manner that suggests the gentle slopes of the region, while a carefully applied gradient of blue paint adds an illusion of depth, reminiscent of gazing towards the horizon. Together, these works by Campbell not only celebrate the beauty of natural landscapes but also showcase the versatility of steel in capturing the essence of the environment.

Owl adopts an alias to navigate the art world, maintaining anonymity to ensure their work stands independently of their personal identity. Their signature style emerges through abstract patterns and lines, repetitively laid down without prior sketching, using spray paint or markers. Owl captures the essence of spontaneous creation, akin to freestyle dancing, where the next move is unknown yet intuitively guided by practice.

THOMAS CAMPBELL, Pines, 2022, painted and blackened steel. Site-specific commission.

THOMAS CAMPBELL, Pines, 2022, painted and blackened steel. Site-specific commission.

THOMAS CAMPBELL, Piedmont, 2022, painted and blackened steel. Site-specific commission.

Hodges Taylor has become a valued partner in supporting our company’s push for employee focused workspaces, adding a layer of depth and interest to our modernized spaces that only art can provide. Their extensive knowledge, network, and expertise combined with their collaborative selection process and flexibility to adapt to project scope and schedule changes has evolved our working relationship beyond the traditional client / vendor dynamic. They have become valued teammates and I look forward to working with them again on future endeavors.”

Senior Designer, Client Team

ANDREW HAYES, Pines, 2022, fabricated steel and paint. Site-specific commission.

OWL, Chillsky, 2022, mural. Site-specific commission.

Social Gathering + Lounge Areas

Dimensional Wall Installations

Mt. Mitchell by Matthew Steele is a striking representation of the Blue Ridge Mountains, meticulously crafted from Baltic birch plywood. Drawing on topographical data from the NASA geographical database, Steele translates the Mt. Mitchell region’s contours into subtle undulations within his piece. These carefully constructed variations are inspired by a cross-section of the mountain’s terrain, bringing the natural beauty and complex geography of Western North Carolina into a tangible, sculptural form.

Eleanor Annand’s Collective, crafted from letterpress printed and die-cut cotton paper, highlights her exploration of the human condition through modular compositions. These pieces, embodying a balance of tension and equilibrium, are designed to reflect the constant state of flux in our lives. Annand’s approach is both analytical and intuitive, allowing her to construct and deconstruct forms in a meditative process that mirrors our ongoing adjustments and transformations.

 

MATTHEW STEELE, Mt. Mitchell, 2022, Baltic birch plywood. Site-specific commission.

ELEANOR ANNAND, Collective, 2022, letterpress printed and die-cut cotton paper. Site-specific commission.

Corridors

Site-Specific Murals + Series

Raishad Glover approaches art with a focus on diligence and simplicity, bridging innovative culture with traditional media. By employing foundational principles and design elements like rhythm, value, line, and color, Glover steers his creative development, crafting works that resonate with both modernity and tradition.

Ellie Richards’ Tufted Timekeeper series presents a collection of clocks, each uniquely crafted from machine-tufted wool. This innovative use of materials blends functionality with artistic exploration, reimagining the conventional clock through the warmth and texture of tufted fabric.

Martha Clippinger’s colorful dimensional murals, Hot Fun and Buoy, activate the corridors with vibrant energy and dynamic forms. Buoy utilizes a continuous horizontal line and circle to create a landscape where water meets sky. The shift in the placement of each circle, slightly higher or lower, creates movement across the series of panels, suggesting a setting sun or a bobbing buoy. In Hot Fun, the arrangement of sixteen panels relates to four four-petaled dogwood flowers. The triangles of the panels and their varied orientations are inspired by quilts, where color and repeated geometries create a sense of rhythm.

MARTHA CLIPPINGER, Hot Fun, 2022, dimensional mural. Site-specific commission.

It’s a special opportunity to create artwork for a specific site. My interest in architecture leads me to create abstract works of specific scales and proportions that will harmonize with their surroundings. I also think about who will experience the work and how. Knowing these works would be in an office environment, I wanted to make them playful and exuberant and full of movement. It was wonderful to work with Hodges Taylor, who conveyed my proposal clearly to the client, and who provided me with the support to produce and install the three-dimensional murals. “

MARTHA CLIPPINGER, Artist

MARTHA CLIPPINGER, buoy, 2022, dimensional mural. Site-specific commission.

RAISHAD GLOVER, Catamaran, Nahcolite, Castalia, Giallolino, Telamon, Uraeus, 2022, graphite, acrylic, bees wax, enamel on hemp board. Commission in collaboration with George Gallery.

ELLIE RICHARDS, Tufted Timekeepers, 2022, recycled wool, quartz clock movement. Commission.

Commons + Secondary Spaces

2D + 3D Objects

Taking inspiration from both personal and institutional stories, Chieko Murasugi uses the language of abstraction to explore the opposing states of peace and conflict. She titles these collages Roshambo, an Americanized version of the Japanese game Rock, Paper, Scissors — an example of playful and peaceful conflict resolution. Among her materials are cutouts from artworks she’s made in the past, now fashioned into the shapes and curves of samurai artifacts. By reusing these materials, which contain marks such as burns and tears, Murasugi explores the material fragments of her past and uses them to both recognize violence and advocate for peace.

CHIEKO MURASUGI, Roshambo #2, #3, #5, 2018, acrylic, mixed media collage, and flashe on paper.

KATRINA SANCHEZ STANDFIELD, Remembering Us, 2022, sustainable fiber. Commission.

Niches

Site-Specific Commissions + Acquisitions

ELLIE RICHARDS, From the series Endless Columns, 2022, locally sourced hardwoods, milk paint, acrylic paint. Site-specific commission.

  • ANDREA DONNELLY, Hills in Clouds #1, 2022, handwoven cotton, dye, PVA, cotton backing. Site-specific commission.
  • ANDREA DONNELLY, Hills in Clouds #1, 2022, handwoven cotton, dye, PVA, cotton backing. Site-specific commission.
  • ANDREA DONNELLY, Electric Columns, 2022, handwoven cotton, dye, PVA, cotton backing. Site-specific commission.
  • ANDREA DONNELLY, Electric Columns, 2022, handwoven cotton, dye, PVA, cotton backing. Site-specific commission.
  • MEREDITH CONNELLY, Magnolia Cross Section, 2022, paper, spray paint. Site-specific commission.
  • MEREDITH CONNELLY, Magnolia Cross Section, 2022, paper, spray paint. Site-specific commission.
  • MEREDITH CONNELLY, Dogwood Cross Section, 2022, paper, spray paint. Site-specific commission.
  • MEREDITH CONNELLY, Dogwood Cross Section, 2022, paper, spray paint. Site-specific commission.
  • MEREDITH CONNELLY, Pine Cross Section, 2022, paper, spray paint. Site-specific commission.
  • MEREDITH CONNELLY, Pine Cross Section, 2022, paper, spray paint. Site-specific commission.

CHIEKO MURASUGI, Solider On in Place and Degrees of Freedom, 2020, acrylic, mixed media collage on panel.

KATRINE HILDEBRANDT, Eternal Loop II, 2023, hand burnt lines, hand dyed fabric, reed and wire on dyed paper. Site-specific commission in collaboration with BK Art Projects.

Reception

Site-Specific Commission

Katrine Hildebrandt brings her unique perspective to the project with artwork inspired by sacred geometry and the exploration of space and time. Utilizing distinctive techniques, such as burning paper, she crafts layered, geometric patterns that invite viewers to consider the balance between chaos and order, and the fleeting nature of existence. Hildebrandt’s work serves as a visual anchor for the space while inviting a deeper appreciation for our interconnectedness through the lens of her meticulous patterns and meditative approach.

KATRINE HILDEBRANDT, Eternal Loop II, 2023, hand burnt lines, hand dyed fabric, reed and wire on dyed paper. Site-specific commission in collaboration with BK Art Projects.

MATTHEW MURPHY, Rabbie, 2018, oil on canvas installation.

CASSANDRA C. JONES, Dandelion, 2019, archival inkjet on alpha-cellulose paper. Acquired through Abigail Ogilvy Gallery.

Secondary Spaces + Library

Works on Paper

Cassandra C. Jones’ Dandelion is a digital collage that encapsulates our technology-driven, image-obsessed society, offering a space for growth and exploration. Through a meticulous assembly of photographs, Jones weaves together sociopolitical narratives with elements of pop culture, presenting a layered exploration of American life that blends the whimsical with the profound and the beautiful, highlighting the complexity of our contemporary existence.

Pelle Casse’s photographic series is a testament to the art of capturing time and movement within a single frame. Employing a meticulous technique, Casse sets his camera on a tripod, shooting up to a thousand pictures over a span of one to two hours from an unchanging vantage point. He then intricately compiles selected figures into a final image, creating a unique still time-lapse effect. Despite the high level of editing, Casse’s process involves no alteration of the content itself; he does not change a single pixel but instead chooses what to include and exclude. The finished works are complex compositions and layered portrayal of a moment in time.

 

CASSANDRA C. JONES, Dandelion, 2019, archival inkjet on alpha-cellulose paper. Acquired through Abigail Ogilvy Gallery.
  • PELLE CASS, Esplanade from Wall, 2013, Second Esplanade, 2013, Esplanade Cyclists, 2013, inkjet print on heavy matte rag paper. Acquired through Abigail Ogilvy Gallery.
  • PELLE CASS, Esplanade from Wall, 2013, Second Esplanade, 2013, Esplanade Cyclists, 2013, inkjet print on heavy matte rag paper. Acquired through Abigail Ogilvy Gallery.
  • PELLE CASS, Esplanade from Wall, 2013, Second Esplanade, 2013, Esplanade Cyclists, 2013, inkjet print on heavy matte rag paper. Acquired through Abigail Ogilvy Gallery.

WOODY DE OTHELLO, Steppin Through The Nights, 2021, color aquatint and softground etching. Acquired through Paulson Fontaine Press.

Woody De Othello’s works on paper extend his exploration of animating the inanimate. Focusing on common domestic items, these pieces showcase Othello’s skill in giving life to everyday objects, now transformed into engaging subjects on paper. Drawing from the African “Nkisi” belief of spirits inhabiting material objects, he infuses each piece with a unique spirit and personality. The objects, portrayed with a sense of humor and whimsy, appear to move and emote across the paper, stretched or slumped as though reacting to unseen forces. These works underscore Othello’s talent for blending traditional themes with contemporary artistry, turning static household items into captivating narratives of movement and emotion.

Karmimadeebora McMillan’s series of works on paper unfolds as a vibrant tapestry of color stories, echoing the intricate patterns and warmth of Southern quilts. Drawing from her childhood in the South, McMillan crafts these pieces into a cohesive narrative that, when displayed together, mirrors the communal and storytelling nature of quilt-making.

WOODY DE OTHELLO, Shifting Through Space, 2021, color aquatint and softground etching. Acquired through Paulson Fontaine Press.

KARMIMADEEBORA MCMILLAN, From the series Quilted Color Study, 2021, acrylic on paper.

LEIGH SUGGS, The Better Half, 2023, handcut, acrylic on Yupo paper.

Created through a precise and distinctive process of drawing, tracing, taping and painting, hand-cutting, perpetual addition and subtraction, Leigh Suggs’ work is simultaneously tactile and conceptual, methodical and instinctual. Through the manipulation of shadows, color and reflections, the intricate cut and seemingly woven patterns bring the painted surface to life.

LEIGH SUGGS, The Better Half, 2023, handcut, acrylic on Yupo paper.

MEG ARSENOVIC, From the series Chesapeake Impact Crater, 2019-2022, acrylic on US road map.

Artist Meg Arsenovic draws on a dramatic event from the earth’s distant past to explore the history of the Tidewater Region in her series Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater.

“It happened 35 million years ago. A meteor the size of Manhattan sailed west over the Atlantic Ocean, crashing directly into what is now the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. The impact, considered one of the most significant in the history of the planet, cracked open the earth’s crust, tearing fault lines from Richmond to the continental shelf. A massive wall of water shot 30 miles high, sending waves past the Blue Ridge Mountains. The collision devastated the entire east coast, engulfing shores from Georgia to New England, sending a tidal wave careening back across the Atlantic ocean, flooding the western coastlines of Europe and Africa. The remaining crater, as deep as the Grand Canyon, now lies buried at the southern gateway to the Chesapeake Bay.

This “impact event” has become the central metaphor in a series reexamining the history of my home, the Tidewater Region. Sifting through memories of elementary school lessons and Disney versions that shaped my early views, this series illustrates the Chesapeake Bay’s true significance and long range impact on the American story.”

MEG ARSENOVIC, From the series Chesapeake Impact Crater, 2019-2022, acrylic on US road map.

RURI YI, From the series Eq, 2023, acrylic on canvas. Site-specific commission in collaboration with HEMPHILL Artworks.

NATALIE CHEUNG, Intersections of Light #060, 2022, color pinhole photograph. Acquired though Morton Fine Art.

Natalie Cheung’s art emerges from the interplay of light, gesture, and the natural world, creating pieces that range from calm to intensely dynamic. Utilizing alternative photographic processes, she captures direct experiences onto photosensitive paper without a camera. Her work, an exploration of abstraction and the essence of photography, reflects a deep engagement with the medium’s history and its evolving relationship with reality.

NATALIE CHEUNG, Intersections of Light #083, 2022, color pinhole photograph. Acquired though Morton Fine Art.

SYLVIO LYNCH, Red 1-3, 2023, colored pencil on paper. Acquired though Reynolds Gallery.

LORI KATZ, From the series Cube Cascades, 2023, ceramic. Site-specific commission.